A few steps away from becoming a

                                                              Private Pilot

Private Pilot Training

A FAA Private Pilot License allows you to fly throughout the United States and even internationally when you comply with the foreign country’s regulations. As a Private Pilot, you can carry passengers for fun but you can’t offer paid flight services. Completion of your Private Pilot License grants you the privilege of flying anywhere under 18,000 feet, during the day and night, and the luxury of flying instead of sitting in highway traffic for business or vacation. Your only real restrictions are visibility, clouds and inclement weather.

 

Part 141 Private Pilot course training syllabi have been evaluated by the FAA and follow a strict protocol. Both the student and the flight schools must adhere exactly to what the FAA has approved so there are no variations in training. The benefit, you can obtain your FAA Private Pilot License in fewer hours, which means shorter training time and less money.

Part 61 Private Pilot courses, in comparison, are simply more flexible in how the training is conducted but have a higher flight hour requirement. It should also be noted that some airlines and Civil Aviation Authorities in other countries require Part 141 training, so make sure you discuss your overall aviation career goals with our Admissions Team for guidance. You can read the 
FAA Federal Aviation Regulations for Part 61 and Federal Aviation Regulations for Part 141 in depth if you really want to understand the differences.